Lee Harvey Oswald in Russia
An Unauthorized History from the Kennedy Assassination 

Marina Oswald Letters 1962 - 1963
Part 2

Copyright Peter Vronsky 1991-2004

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LETTER 3:   APRIL 27, 1963, TEXAS.

Hello dear aunt Valya and uncle Ilya:

It was a while ago that I got your letter and I was glad to receive it.  But I got held up replying because of all sorts of domestic concerns.  Forgive me.

Right now I am living with our little daughter at our acquaintances in Irving, near Dallas.  Alek has gone away to New Orleans.  This is because he has no work, and there seem to be no prospects here.  So we have decided to move over closer to the sea.  Maybe he will be luckier in his birth place.  We have money for about two months so all this is not terrible so far.  In that time something should be found.  Alka took all the things with him so it will be easier for me and Marinka to leave here on the bus.  It is ten hours away.  Probably we, that is, I and Marinka, Ruth, and the children will go by car.  Ruth is great.  She is an American woman.  She is studying Russian at the university and is very glad I am living with her and able to help her learn Russian better.  She divorced her husband and lives with her children but she is lonely alone at home. 

The husband comes twice a week to see the children.  They in fact just do not live together, but officially they are not divorced.  He finances the house where she lives and pays the bills.  He is also happy that Ruth is not as lonely with me.  We are thinking to go to New Orleans in a while.  She was never there and would like to take a vacation.

Alka left just two days ago.  There is no letter yet, but he will write right away how it is there.  We may leave soon so write to us at our Dallas postal box -- the letter will be forwarded on.  I do not know what our postal box number will be in New Orleans.  Box 2915, Dallas, Texas, USA.

Everything is fine.  Our daughter is growing up healthy and she is a good girl.  We and Alka love her very much and Alka looks after her.  If she starts crying... you know, he is crazy.  He gives you and uncle Ilya his regards and told me to write you after he leaves and I have more time. 

The weather is very good.  There are rains and it is not too hot.  I have been wearing little shorts and we all had time to get tanned.  But it will be a little lonely here when Ruth leaves with her children for three days for the holidays in San Antonio.  And Alka will not be here.  I will watch television.  Just the other day there was a broadcast from London of Princess Alexandra's wedding.  It was very festive and beautiful.  It was held in a big ancient cathedral and the ceremony was very traditional.  It was so interesting -- I got goose-bumps.

I am beginning to speak English a little and Ruth helps me too.  I understand a lot but still need to systematically study.  Which is what I do.

We at last got Ogonek and Soviet Belorussia so we know what is happening in Minsk and everything in the Union.  I have Russian books.  Alka buys them for me in New York.  That is, they send them from there:  Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pushkin.  When we have more dough we will see; I will buy some more.  I do not have complete collections.

Recently it was Easter and we went to a lake and Alka caught two big fish.  They were 450 grams.  On an ordinary hook.  There were many vacationers and fishermen too.  Everybody rushed with their rods to that spot but no more big fish were caught.  Alka laughed that their fishing rods were twenty-thirty dollars kind, not like ours that cost 15 cents.  We will be catching crabs and good fish in New Orleans.  It is a port there.  What will happen next I will write, but in the meantime I send you best wishes and to our acquaintances -- especially the Andrianovs.  Luda must be finishing -- I wonder where they will send her.  How are things?  No answers from work.  Innesa has been silent.  She must be busy.  I do not know who was born to Oleg.  On this I end. 

I kiss and embrace you,

Marina

 

Marina Oswald and June, Dallas, January 1963.
Photo by Lee Harvey Oswald.  The format appears to
be similar to that of the notorious "backyard" photos
of Oswald with a rifle.  Lee sent this photo to
his friend Pavel in Minsk in 1963.

Photo courtesy of Pavel Golovachev, Minsk, Belorussia.

LETTER 4:  MAY 18, 1963.  New Orleans

Hello my dear uncle Ilya and aunt Valya!

I am hurrying to inform you that there is no reason to worry.  The whole family has moved to New Orleans.  Alka found the same kind of work he had in Dallas, ie, photography.  He like it very much and I am happy.  Now at least he knows what to look for specifically.  That is much better than when we arrived and he did not know where to turn -- what to look for.  This is not bad work -- at least a specialty.  He does not photograph people -- this is technical photography -- more specifically, commercial -- for magazines and print and newspapers.  We see his work and he brags that he works in newspapers.  At last fortune has smiled upon him.  By the way, I can brag that I was first who suggested he go to New Orleans.  Here Alka has relatives and in the end that is better than nothing.

By the way, aunt Lillian and her husband are very nice and simple people.  They have five grown children and they love kids in general.  They treat us very well.

We live on the same street that Alka works on.  He travels to work by trolley bus for about fifteen to twenty minutes.  Not far away is the Mississippi, about twenty-five minutes walk and on the other side of the city a big lake with a beautiful beach.  We have already gone swimming there.  Marinka was most happy.  She cried when we took her out of the water.  She is beginning to walk a little.  She is amusing and interesting for us.

The city is old -- the original settlers were French.  Many streets are name in French.  In the French Quarter there are many foreign tourists.  For the first time I saw how a barely clad girl -- if you can call a transparent material that -- dancing in a bar.  We and Alka were walking around there one evening and you could see many unexpected things through an open door.  I know about things like that but I was quite surprised anyway.  Indecent!

It is good that there are many fish here which I like very much.  On Saturday we will go to catch crabs.  We already bought some eels and crabs.  Alka handles them himself -- he does not trust anybody.  It is a very pleasant occupation preparing them, cleaning, and especially eating them.  If only you were here -- you would cook them up!  Soon pictures from the beach will be ready.  I will send them out.  How are things with you?  Alka sends his regards.

Dear aunt Valya.  This is only for you.  Now I know for sure that Alka loves me and this is very pleasing.  I am not the only one to come to this realization, but also Ruth who was here for a few days.  She could speak with him in English and Russian.  That is very good practice.  So I am very happy.  It is good that we are living together.  All kinds of things happen.

I kiss you tightly,

Marina


LETTER 5:  DECEMBER 14, 1963.  DALLAS

Dear uncle Ilya and aunt Valya, Happy New Year!

I wish from all my heart much health, happiness and strength. 

Kiss you tightly,

Marina

Dallas 14 Dec 1963


Lee Harvey Oswald in Russia
An Unauthorized History from the Kennedy Assassination 

Marina Oswald Letters 1962 - 1963
Part 2

Copyright Peter Vronsky 1991-2004


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